Posted in To independence and Bee-Yond

2020 To independence and bee-yond conference….

2020 conference logo

Our student organised conference on the 30/03/2020 is going to be exciting, so get your free ticket booked ASAP. The conference is for occupational therapy practitioners working in and around Greater Manchester (or further afield) and students. The conference is a day full of workshops, seminars, and keynotes showcasing and promoting occupational therapy in a variety of health and social care environments.

Topics include:

  • Social Prescribing
  • The use of MOHO
  • Emerging roles in community rehabilitation
  • Adaptations without delay
  • Occupational therapy and loneliness
  • Development of an assistive technology library
  • New guidance on walking frame assessment and prescription
  • Occupational Therapy within the field of gynaecology and obstetrics
  • The use of humour in occupational therapy
  • Sensory Integration and Sensory Processing
  • Maintaining Resilience in the Workplace
  • Seating and Postural Management
  • Managing behaviour through safe spaces
  • Using yoga and mindfulness to inform occupational therapy interventions for individuals with Autism….and much more

There will also be a product and equipment exhibition area and poster presentation space.

To book your free ticket (which includes a free lunch!) and to see the full conference programme visit here

 

Posted in Home Modification Process Protocol, Home Modification Process Protocol Blogs, PhD Blog

Home Modification Process Protocol – Edinburgh Event

Are you an occupational therapist based around Edinburgh and interested and involved in the home adaptation/modification process, then the following event my be of interest.

The Home Modification Process Protocol (HMPP) was developed as part of a research project investigating the role of occupational therapists in the design and construction of home adaptations/modifications. We have now gained additional funding for a small event for the purposes of discussing with practitioners a strategy for disseminating and developing the HMPP. This day long, focus group style, events begins with an introduction and training on the HMPP, followed by a discussion about how you would like to see the process developing and disseminating.

These two videos provide further information about the original research project and introduce the HMPP. If you are interested in taking part in this exciting event, or require further information, please e-mail r.c.russell@salford.ac.uk

 

Rachel Russell

Posted in PhD Blog

Home Modification Process Protocol Event

Are you a UK based occupational therapist interested and involved in the home adaptation/modification process?

The Home Modification Process Protocol (HMPP) was developed by
our very own Rachel Russell as part of a research project investigating the role of occupational therapists in the design and construction of home adaptations/modifications. We have now gained additional funding for a small event for the purposes of discussing with practitioners a strategy for disseminating and developing the HMPP. This day long, focus group style, event will be taking place at the College of Occupational Therapists in London on the 30th March 2017 and we are looking for a range of practitioners who work in this field of practice to take part. However, if there is enough interest from practitioners in the Northwest then we are considering holding an event here at the University of Salford.

These two videos provide further information about the original research project and introduce the HMPP. If you are interested in taking part in this exciting event, or require further information, please e-mail r.c.russell@salford.ac.uk

https://media.salford.ac.uk/Play/7768
https://media.salford.ac.uk/Play/7771

Posted in Home Modification Process Protocol, Home Modification Process Protocol Blogs, PhD Blog

Home Modification Process Protocol – event for OTs

Are you a UK based occupational therapist interested and involved in the home adaptation/modification process?

The Home Modification Process Protocol (HMPP) was developed as part of a research project investigating the role of occupational therapists in the design and construction of home adaptations/modifications. We have now gained additional funding for a small event for the purposes of discussing with practitioners a strategy for disseminating and developing the HMPP. This day long, events begins with an introduction to and training on the HMPP, followed by a discussion about how you would like to see the process developing and disseminating.. Travel costs will be covered and refreshments provided.

These two videos below provide further information about the original research project and introduce the HMPP. If you are interested in taking part in this exciting event on the 30th March at College of Occupational Therapists, or require further information, please e-mail r.c.russell@salford.ac.uk

Dr Rachel Russell

27/01/2017

 

Posted in PGCAP Blogs

Reflection 1: Educational Autobiography (My learning journey)

This first blog is my educational autobiography and it has the purpose of helping me to reflect on my own experience of education. Although my education began at the age of four, the starting point for this autobiography is 1994 when I left Coventry Polytechnic having completed my undergraduate degree in occupational therapy. I would say this course equipped me with the technical skills to be able to do the job of an occupational therapist but not the language to be able to express and explain the concepts underpinning what I did. However, this slowly changed. After being qualified for a couple of years I began to have students working alongside me as part of their clinical training. These students asked questions about why I was doing what I was doing. This questioning motivated me to reach for the text books and journal articles to explore the theory behind my practice. Through this self-directed learning, I began to develop and be able to express a deeper theoretical understanding of occupational therapy practice. Completing an MSc in Accessibility and Inclusive Design, in 2011, and a Ph.D in 2016, has been a further way of developing a deeper theoretical understanding of my practice.

In attempting to understand the above narrative, I would argue that my initial undergraduate training was based on a type of folk theory of learning (Beretier and Scardamalia 1996), where the student’s mind is viewed as a ‘container’ which needs to be filled by the lecturer with the traditions and ideologies, in this case those of the occupational therapy profession. Furthermore, folk theory of learning explains why as students we were never encouraged, or even thought it necessary, to question the knowledge we were being ‘filled’ with. Whilst this approach to teaching was effective in giving me the practical skills necessary to do the job, my level of knowledge was not sufficient when called upon to explain the concepts of what I did as an occupational therapist.

It could be argued that my reaction to my difficulty in coping with answering student’s questions about the theory behind the skills I was using in clinical practice was an internal trigger to conduct problem based learning. A problem based approach to learning ‘empowers a learner to conduct research, integrate theory and practice, and apply knowledge and skills to develop a viable solution to a defined problem’ (Savery 2006). Educational constructivist theorists would explain that learning occurs through this approach to teaching because students experience a conceptual change to the way they view the world (Biggs and Tang 2011). In my situation, this conceptual change resulted in my being able to understand and explain the theory behind why my practice skills change the health and well-being of the people I treated.

It is no longer sufficient for occupational therapy education to be about students acquiring the skills to do the job of a therapist. As the college of Occupational Therapists (2017) makes clear, in a political climate where it is necessary to show the economic value of any health and social care interventions there is an expectation that students and practitioners are able to explain and express how the unique skills of the profession can contribute to the health economy of the UK. Therefore, Boniface (2008) suggests occupational therapy training has to be a process whereby practical skills are gained alongside an ability to articulate the theory of why the profession improves health and well-being through interventions that change occupational performance and participation.

From this reflection I have identify the following action to develop my own role and skills as a teaching in higher education – the letters in brackets demonstrates how this action links to dimensions in the UK Professional Standards Framework for teaching and supporting learning in higher education:

  • Identify if my current use of self in the teaching environment appropriate? (A1, A2, V1)
  • Improve my ability to assess student learning after each session I teach (A3, K5, K4).
  • Improve my ability to give formative feedback to support and enhance the learning experience of students (V1, A3).
  • Improve my knowledge of how students learn about challenging concepts? (K3)

References

Bereiter, C., & Scardamalia, M. (1996). Rethinking learning. In D.R. Olson, & N. Torrance (Eds.),The Handbook of education and human development: New models of learning, teaching andschooling (pp 485-513). Cambridge, MA:Basil Blackwell.4

Biggs, J.B., Tang, C., 2011. Teaching for quality learning at university. London: McGraw-Hill Education.

Boniface, G., Fedden, T., Hurst, H., Mason, M., Phelps, C., Reagon, C. and Waygood, S., 2008. Using theory to underpin an integrated occupational therapy service through the Canadian Model of Occupational Performance. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 71(12), pp.531-539.

COT Improving Lives. (2017). About the campaign: Improving Lives, Saving Money – COT Improving Lives. [online] Available at: http://cotimprovinglives.com/about/ [Accessed 11 Jan. 2017].

Heacademy.ac.uk. (2017). UK Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF) | Higher Education Academy. [online] Available at: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ukpsf [Accessed 10 November 2016].

 

 

Posted in PGCAP Blogs

Reflection 2 Tutor observation (Use of self in the teaching environment)

This second blog is based on reflections facilitated by a discussion with the PGCAP tutor following their observations of a teaching session. The focus of this reflection is on the use of humour in the learning environment. The session observed by the PGCAP tutor involved students hearing a speaker talk on his experience of using an aspect of the National Health and Social Care service. This is a key session for the students as they use their experience of the session to write an essay based reflection of what they have learnt about the challenges of being a service user of health and social care in the UK. At the beginning of the session the PGCAP tutor noted how I used humour at the beginning of the session to draw attention to the importance of the session to the assignment.

Although I do not claim to be a stand-up comedian, I agree with the work of Tait et al (2015) who argue that teaching is a form of public performance and as such a teacher will adopt different types of persona’s to inform their performance, including the use of humour. In this instance, my motivation for using humour was based on the assumption that it would be an effective way of drawing the student’s attention to the importance of the session without sounding authoritarian. However, in discussing the use of the humour in this situation with the PGCAP tutor, the tutor raised the argument that rather than motivating the students to engage in the session it could have raised their anxiety levels about the assessment. This feedback was a concern to me as my intention had been the reverse and it made me consider what the role of using humour is in my teaching is.

In the teaching environment humour has been described as a communication device that can be used by the lecturer (Wanzer, Grymier, Wojtaszczyk and Smith 2006). A literature review, by Banas, Dunbar, Rodriguez & Liu (2011), into the use of humour in higher education identifies three broad functions in the teaching environment. The first function is it can be used to build relationships with students. The second is  it can be a method of managing difficult situations that arise in the classroom environment or from the learning material, for example using humour to explain a difficult concept. Finally, humour can be used as a method by which the lecturer builds their reputation and standing amongst the students. In this situation my intention was to use humour to manage the tension that can arise from discussing assessments with students.

As with all types of communications devices, Wanzer et al (2006) warns it is important that humour is used competently and based on their research findings they identified the following features for the appropriate and competent use of humour in the learning. Firstly, although humour can be used to promote positive student behaviour it should not be used to isolate or stigmatise a particular student or group of students. The amount of humour used is also important, over use of humour can be distracting for students. Finally, if using humour to introduce and explain difficult or important concepts it is imperative that the teacher provides supplemental teaching material and ensures students have understood the material fully.

Using the UK Professional Standards Framework for teaching and supporting learning in higher education, from this reflection I have learnt that humour is an effective teaching device (A2) and when used appropriately can be employed to support student learning (K3). However, as with all teaching tools it is important that when I use humour in the teaching environment it respects the needs of individual learners (V1). From this reflection I have begun to take the following action– the letters in brackets demonstrates how this action relates to the descriptors in the UK Professional Standards:

  • Identifying the ways in which I use humour in the learning environment to ensure that it support learning (A2)

As recommended by in the above reading:

  • Avoiding the over use of humour in the classroom environment (A1)
  • Ensuring I do not use humour to raise anxiety levels of the students (V2)
  • Ensuring any humour used to explain concepts is supported by additional learning material and checking that the students have achieved the intended learning outcomes (K5)

References

Bekelja Wanzer, M., Bainbridge Frymier, A., Wojtaszczyk, A.M. and Smith, T., 2006. Appropriate and inappropriate uses of humor by teachers. Communication Education, 55(2), pp.178-196.

Banas, J.A., Dunbar, N., Rodriguez, D. and Liu, S.J., 2011. A review of humor in educational settings: Four decades of research. Communication Education, 60(1), pp.115-144.

Heacademy.ac.uk. (2017). UK Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF) | Higher Education Academy. [online] Available at: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ukpsf [Accessed 10 November 2016].

Tait, G., Lampert, J., Bahr, N. and Bennett, P., 2015. Laughing with the lecturer: the use of humour in shaping university teaching. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 12(3), p.7.